Archive for February 2012

A new Apple TV

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

Sources: New Apple TV launching in March, near-immediate availability hinted for new iPads | 9to5Mac | Apple Intelligence.

The new Apple TV is rumored to include a faster processor, possibly a variation of the dual-core A5 chip. The dual-core A5 chip has been said to be required for the Apple TV to finally stream 1080p quality video, but Apple is also working on an “A5X” chip that is dual-core, which also includes an improved graphics engine. Those two components of the chip would likely delivery the smooth video playback that Apple would include in such a product. Other possibilities from the rumor-mill include a redesigned Bluetooth 4.0 remote control, and Siri support, but those are not rumors that we can independently confirm yet. This new Apple TV would make sense to launch with a new 1080P movie service from Apple’s iTunes Store.

There have been rumors for some time that Apple is planning a TV set, but it sounds like there’s a more imminent release of an updated Apple TV, the box that plugs into your regular TV. I’ve been a big fan of the current iteration – it’s great for streaming home movies to your TV, and there’s been a recent push to turn it into a mirrored display, reflecting what you see on your iPad (or soon, your Mac).

I’m not sure how much difference 1080p video will really make; just reducing the compression of existing video would probably make a bigger difference. That said, improved quality is always nice. I’m guessing there’s got to be something more than a slightly faster box with slightly improved video quality. Apps could be a game changer.

Motorola fails in patent block

Monday, February 27th, 2012

FOSS Patents: Motorola can’t enforce standard-essential patents against Apple in Germany while appeal is pending — huge victory for Apple, bad news for Google

Apple scored a breakthrough court victory today against Motorola (Bloomberg was first to report). Its importance can hardly be overstated. This is so huge that it even begs the question of whether Google’s strategy for its $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola Mobility has failed before the deal is even formally closed (they’re still waiting for some regulatory approvals).

Seems like a pretty big deal.