For the past several years, I’ve eschewed boneless, skinless chicken breasts (BSCB) for their moister, more flavorful, and probably less-health cousins: boneless, skinless chicken thighs (BSCT). Though some will surely critque the absence of flavor-supplying bones and skin, the reality is that even the….BS variety requires a fair amount of preparation. Though trimmed of the large sections of fat, BSCTs have hidden pockets of chicken fat that can result in an unpleasant surprise for eaters if not removed before cooking. I have become much faster and more effective at locating and excising the culprit yellow-white blobs with kitchen shears, but working with a pile of chicken at a countertop while your hungry family glowers at you from across the kitchen is not an enjoyable way to spend a weeknight.

BSCBs offer the promise of considerably less effort. They are essentially free of internal fat stores, and the small amounts of residual surface fat are typically rendered off during cooking. The problem: chicken breast can easily become dry and stringy during cooking. While brining can help to ameliorate the situation, it detracts from the original promise of reduced prep work and the resulting meet can be a bit waterlogged. Dry brining is superior, but takes more time and, thus, planning.

Inspired by this article, I decided to try a sous vide approach with BSCB and have been amazed by the results. One or two hours at 140 degrees F (60 degrees C) results in moist, tender chicken breast that can easily serve as the centerpiece of a main dinner dish with minimal flavoring and preparation. The basic approach involves a simple dusting of kosher salt and pepper (and any other flavors that are desired), sealing in a watertight bag (e.g. with a FoodSaver), and a bath in the water tank. Following the sous vide cooking (which apparently can continue for up to four hours without ill effects, though I have not testing the limits myself), I give the chicken a quick sear in a hot pan with a bit of oil and butter. A roast under a hot broiler works as well. As BSCB tend to be a bit more domed than BSCT, I have found that it helps to pound them in a plastic bag prior to cooking, so they lay more flat in the pan, giving a greater surface area for searing,

The sous vide approach is mind-bogglingly simple. While the flavor will never be identical to BSCT, the saved labor and healthier profile has led to a marked shift in my preferred cut of chicken.

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